Japan Eats

Recipe: Tebasaki to daikon no kurozuni (simmered chicken wingtips with daikon)

The perfect antidote to those winter blues

This is a popular (and inexpensive) dish usually eaten during the colder months in Japan. It can be served as either an appetizer or as a main course.

It’s worth keeping in mind that the browning of the chicken wings is important in giving the dish it’s deep and savory smell. I recommend you to adopt a similar approach when cooking thick negi (spring onions) or deep-fried tofu to be used in nimono or nabe.

Add the kurozu (black vinegar) to the chicken stock at the very end when cooking the chicken.

Tebasaki to daikon no kurozuni (simmered chicken wingtips with daikon)

Tebasaki to daikon no kurozuni (simmered chicken wingtips with daikon)

Ingredients (serves 4)

  • 600 g of chicken wings
  • 500-600 g of daikon (Japanese radish)
  • 30 g of ginger
  • 4 boiled eggs

Sauce

  • 2 tablespoons of sugar
  • 6 tablespoons of sake
  • 4 tablespoons of soy Sauce
  • 1 tablespoon of mirin
  • 2 tablespoons of black vinegar
  • 2 cups of cold water

Method

First, prepare the chicken wings. Cut off the very tip of the wings tips. Use the knife and cut the gristle, then break it with your hands. This is both for looks and to make the wings easier to eat.

Next, prepare the daikon. Peal it and slice into pieces 2 – 3 cm thick, then cut into half rounds or quarters. Now peal the ginger and cut it into 1 mm slices.

Place a casserole dish on the gas table, pour 3 tablespoons of vegetable oil into the pot and warm it on the low to medium heat.

Remove the liquid on the chicken wings with a paper towel and then sauté with the skin face down until they are browned.

Be patient and don’t turn them around often so as to brown them. Don’t worry – the skin won’t stick to the bottom of the casserole if you brown them enough.

Add all the ingredients for the sauce  except the kurozu (black vinegar). Next, drop the ginger and daikon into the casserole dish and turn up the heat to medium-high.

Once the liquid comes to the boil, turn it down to a low heat and put the lid on. Simmer for about 30 minutes until the daikon becomes soft.

While you’re cooking the soup, prepare the boiled eggs. I am sure that everybody knows how to do that…!

Once the eggs are cooked, move them to a cold bowl of water and let them sit in the bowl for 2-3 minutes, then remove the shells.

Confirm the daikon is soft and add the kurozu and the boiled egg. Cook for another 10 minutes with an otoshibuta (a drop lid made from paper) over the ingredients. For instructions on how to prepare one, click here.

Serve the chicken wings, daikon and egg halves, taking care to arrange the ingredients so they look good on the plate.

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