Japan Eats

Recipe: Matcha ice-cream

A delicious summer dessert

Summer has well and truly arrived and what better way to beat the heat than to make your own ice-cream?

In Japan, one of the most popular ice-cream flavors is matcha, or green tea.

Ideally one would use an ice-cream machine to churn and freeze the mixture, however with a little extra effort it’s possible to make matcha ice-cream without one.

Matcha ice-cream

Matcha ice-cream

Ingredients (Serves 4)

  • 100 ml milk
  • 5 g matcha
  • 7 g corn starch
  • 50 g granulated sugar
  • 100 ml fresh cream

Method

Put all of the ingredients other than the fresh cream into a pan and place on a low heat.

Mix with a whisk and once it has thickened, turn off the gas and allow the mixture to cool.

Place the cream in the bowl and whisk until thickened (it should still drip slowly from the whisk). Pour the now cool matcha into the cream.

Pour the combined ingredients into a plastic container and freeze for 3 to 4 hours.

Scoop the ice-cream from the container and serve.

Japan Eats Podcast: Episode 6, “Make mine an Intangible”

This week we discuss carcinogenic pickles and UNESCO recognition for traditional Japanese cuisine

The Japan Eats Podcast is presented by Garrett DeOrio, Marcus Lovitt, and Christopher Pellegrini. To listen, click play on the audio player below:

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You can also subscribe to the fortnightly Japan Eats feed via iTunes or directly with our RSS feed.

Find the Japan Eats Facebook page here. Have something to say? Drop us a line.

In this week’s Japan Eats Podcast, Garrett DeOrio, Marcus Lovitt, and James Steele talk about the potential for pickles to cause cancer and moves to have traditional Japanese cuisine recognized by UNESCO.

Here are some links to what we discussed:

Intro/outro: “Aguamala” by Carne Cruda

You can e-mail us at lovitt@japaneats.tv

Follow us on the Japan Eats Twitter feed. And please “Like” Japan Eats on Facebook.

Recipe: Goya champuru

It ain’t easy being green

On the face of it, goya isn’t the most appetizing of fruit. With its dark green complexion, prickly texture and bitter taste, it looks like a cross between a cucumber and a durian. Even its English name is less than appealing – ‘bitter gourd’.

But while it may look intimidating and taste bitter uncooked, goya is actually delicious when properly prepared. And it’s easy to remove much of the bitterness. Simply scoop out the seeds and slice into thin pieces. Soak these in water for 10 – 20 minutes and you’re done.

The fruit is said to have a variety of health benefits (it’s high in Vitamin C) and is commonly used in traditional medicines to combat such things as diabetes and high blood pressure.

Goya is a key ingredient in Okinawan cuisine (the name itself is Okinawan – nigauri in Japanese) and goya champaru is the prefecture’s signature dish. Goya champaru is popular elsewhere in Japan, particularly during the summer months.

This preparation is for a very simple version of the dish. To add volume and texture, add a handful of moyashi (bean shoots). You can also add pickled ginger as a garnish.

Goya champuru

Goya champuru

Ingredients (serves 2)

  • 1 goya
  • 200 to 350 g tofu (momen tofu)
  • 100 to 150 g pork (sliced butabara pork is best)
  • 2 eggs
  • 1 tablespoon sesame oil
  • 1/2 tablespoon soy sauce
  • 5 g kezuribushi

Method

First cut the goya in half and take the seeds out using a tea spoon. These seeds and the white pith around them is very bitter and should be removed carefully. Next, slice the goya into 5 mm slices. Place these into a bowl of iced water for around 10 to 20 minutes (this too is to minimize the bitterness).

While the goya is soaking in the cold water, wrap the tofu with a paper towel and warm it in a microwave for 3 minutes in order to draw the water out of the tofu. Now cut the pork into bite size pieces and mix with a pinch of salt and pepper. Pour 1 tablespoon of salad oil into a pan and cook the pork. Strain the water from the goya and as soon as the pieces of pork begin to change color, add the green vegetable to the mix. Cook the pork and goya together for 1 to 2 minutes.

Breaking the tofu into small pieces by hand, add these to the mixture in the pan. Season with a pinch of salt, a pinch of pepper and 1/2 tablespoon of soy sauce. Mix thoroughly, trying not do break the tofu up too much.

Crack the eggs and pour them into the pan, making a circle around the edges of the pan. Cook these slowly. When the egg begins to cook, turn off the gas and pour a dash of sesame oil into the pan.

Serve, placing kezuribushi onto the top of the dish.

Japan Eats Podcast: Episode 5, “Roadtrip”

This week we talk about shochu, Kagoshima and Marcus’s problem with nature

The Japan Eats Podcast is presented by Garrett DeOrio, Marcus Lovitt, and Christopher Pellegrini. To listen, click play on the audio player below:

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.

You can also subscribe to the fortnightly Japan Eats feed via iTunes or directly with our RSS feed.

Find the Japan Eats Facebook page here. Have something to say? Drop us a line.

In this week’s Japan Eats Podcast, Garrett DeOrio, Marcus Lovitt, and Christopher Pellegrini talk about researching shochu in Kyushu.

Here are some links to what we discussed this week:

Intro/outro: “Aguamala” by Carne Cruda

You can e-mail us at lovitt@japaneats.tv

Follow us on the Japan Eats Twitter feed. And please “Like” Japan Eats on Facebook.